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How to Get a Second Job

How to Get a Second Job Photo

©Depositphotos/olly18

You’re primary source of income might not be enough to pay for all of your expenses so you decide to get an additional job. It’s hard to get a job, especially nowadays that hundreds of thousands of people compete for the same position.

If you ever need extra income, there are lots of additional part-time jobs that you can choose from. Consider these things in getting an extra job.

Consider your time

Do you still have extra time for an extra job? If you get an additional job, how much of your time for other matters would be left?

Typically, you’re working eight times a day for five days every week, not including overtime work hours. You’ll only have the remaining forty-eight hours of the weekend to spend on other matters. Things like taking your time to relax, doing your regular chores like cleaning the house and doing the laundry, preparing for the coming week or even spending quality time with your loved ones might all be sacrificed for extra income.

Think if you would like to spend your remaining time of the week for more work. If you’re a single parent, it might be harder to take additional work. More work could mean lesser time for you and your child to be together but probably more money for a more stable future.

Skills and capabilities

If you like writing, you can apply to be a part-time contributor for newspaper and magazine articles. Write about cars, politics or entertainment – it depends on your interest and work availability.

You can also be a yoga or gym instructor during weekends. Offer music lessons if you’re good at playing instruments. Be a tour guide of local attractions. Or be expert in arbitraging and conquer eBay or other online auction sites.

Think of the skills you can use to make money. Market your capabilities. There are a lot of employers looking for able workers even for part-time only.

Consider the costs

Like the application for your first job, it’s likely that you’ll be traveling around finding additional work. If you happen to find one, consider how much transportation and meals could cost you.

If you have an online job and you need to be in front of your computer for eight or more hours, consider the additional toll on your monthly bills for electricity and internet connection.

Apply for a job

If you’re all set, then you can start looking for an extra job. Search online sites, classifieds and newspapers for any job opening that might interest you. You can also try company websites to see if they need any part-time workers.

Reel in your contacts and ask if there are openings in their companies or if they can recommend one they know of. Decide if you want a job that needs you to work someplace else or one that can be done at home.

Gains and strains

You’ll gain extra money but you’ll also get additional physical strain and mental stress. If you can handle all the headache from having extra responsibility, then you’re ready to find an extra work.

Your extra work should not affect the quality of your primary job. If you’re not getting enough sleep and you doze off during your regular working hours, then it’s time to reconsider continuing your extra job.

Additional income

How much will you be earning in that additional job? Calculate how much will be your net income. If you think all the effort will be worth the return, then go for the job.

A higher income means more tax for you. If your new total income exceeds your former bracket, then your extra job could be more of a burden instead of a help. For example, your current income as unmarried individual is $8,500; you got an extra job for $750 more. The tax you’ll be paying for 2012 will increase from 10% to 15% because your income exceeded your bracket.